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Tag: Trail Runs

Carbon Canyon Regional Park – Redwood Grove Lollipop





Vital Stats
Trailhead denture +Brea, ampoule +CA+92823&hl=en&ll=33.92091,-117.829828&spn=0.009829,0.01929&sll=33.919289,-117.835429&sspn=0.009402,0.01929&vpsrc=0&gl=us&hnear=4442+Carbon+Canyon+Rd,+Brea,+California+92823&t=m&z=16″>4442 Carbon Canyon Road
Brea, CA 92823
Length 2.62 Miles
Elevation 151 Feet
Difficulty Very Easy

Carbon Canyon Regional Park is a true regional park, not a wilderness park in any way. The majority of the park is comprised of a lake for fishing and large grassy open areas. There are also numerous shelters with tables and BBQs, tennis and volleyball courts, baseball fields, and playgrounds. There are also four groves of trees located around the park. Three of the four are easily accessible by car, but the only way to visit the grove of Coastal Redwoods is via the park’s only “nature” trail.

The Carbon Canyon Regional Park nature trail that leads to the redwood grove is the best maintained trail I’ve seen in Orange County. It’s wide, flat and utterly boring. The trail starts at the far eastern edge of the park, through the pinewood grove. Once through the pinewood grove, the trail drops down slightly to cross a dry stream bed and then climbs back up just slightly. Once level again, the trail continues westerly between the foot of the hill and Carbon Canyon Stream.

Currently, Carbon Canyon Stream is being dredged. From the work being done, it looks like they are preparing to line the stream with concrete and generally make it feel less natural. Even without the work being done on the stream, the trail never feels a part of nature. It’s always possible to see the manicured lawns of the park proper or the giant dam that doesn’t seem to hold back any water.

As you continue on the trail it curves around slightly to the left where you’ll see the redwood grove. The dozens of redwoods that make up the grove were planted in the mid-1970s, when the park was first opening. Costal Redwoods are not a native species in Orange County and when you walk through the grove you can tell that they don’t belong. There is no ecosystem around the trees, simply trees in the near dead, hard packed ground of Orange County. The type of magic that’s present in a natural redwood forest is simply missing in this artificial grove. Continue reading Carbon Canyon Regional Park – Redwood Grove Lollipop

Oak Canyon Nature Center – Tranquility Trail, Wren Way, Bluebird Loop





Oak Canyon Nature Center

Vital Stats
Trailhead artificial +Anaheim, prostate +CA&hl=en&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=38.365962,79.013672&vpsrc=0&hnear=6700+Walnut+Canyon+Rd,+Anaheim,+California+92807&t=m&z=16″>6700 Walnut Canyon RdAnaheim, CA 92807
Length 1.89 Miles
Elevation 194 Feet
Difficulty Easy

Oak Canyon Nature Center is a small park nestled in the canyons of Anaheim Hills. The park is ideal for parents and children looking for just a taste of the outdoors. For locals, the Oak Canyon Nature Center is also a great place for short trail runs or hikes when you just want to get out of the house. Unfortunately, Oak Canyon isn’t open to mountain bikes, but honestly it isn’t big enough to really enjoy yourself on a bike anyways.

This route takes you through the south side of Oak Canyon Nature Center, which is wooded with a thick oak forest and back down along the main access road that runs the length of the park. The north side of the park, which this route doesn’t explore, is much more barren. The trail starts just past and behind the interpretive center.

Oak Canyon Nature Center

Tranquility Trail heads slightly up hill through an old grove of oak trees. There are a couple of offshoots from the trail that head up into the neighborhoods at the top of the hill. Once the trail makes a meandering horseshoe U-turn to the left the trail levels off and transitions into California chaparral.

Tranquility Trail continues until it runs into Wren Way. You can take Tranquility Trail back down to the main access road or continue strait onto Wren Way. Wren Way is a trail covered with a low canopy of trees that undulates as it heads slightly uphill. Wren Way follows along a drainage channel, over a number of bridges built as Eagle Scout projects over the years. Continue reading Oak Canyon Nature Center – Tranquility Trail, Wren Way, Bluebird Loop

Weir Canyon Wilderness Park – Anaheim Hills Riding and Walking Trail

 




[flickr id=”6174453212″ thumbnail=”small” overlay=”false” size=”medium” group=”” align=”left”]

Vital Stats
Trailhead page +anaheim, herbal +ca&hl=en&ll=33.830551, cialis -117.744277&spn=0.009821,0.01929&sll=33.831425,-117.741165&sspn=0.009821,0.01929&vpsrc=0&t=h&z=16″ target=”_blank”>S. Hidden Canyon Rd. &
E. Overlook Terrace
Anaheim, CA
Length 3.55 Miles
Elevation 328 Feet
Difficulty Moderate

 

The Anaheim Hills Riding and Walking Trail makes a loop throughout the entire Weir Canyon Wilderness Park in Anaheim, California. This route is a moderately difficult hike and a hard trail run, but is considerably easier when done in the reverse direction. The trailhead is located behind an older neighborhood called Hidden Canyon, just off of Serrano Ave. in Anaheim Hills.

[flickr id=”6174454778″ thumbnail=”small” overlay=”false” size=”medium” group=”” align=”left”] From the trailhead, you head up a short hill to a “Y” in the trail. This route takes the left hand “Y”, but to do the trail in the reverse direction for an easier hike, simply take the right hand “Y”. From the “Y”, you continue climbing up to the ridge behind Anaheim Hills. There are parts of this climb that are quite steep and sandy, so finding footing can be difficult. At some points, it feels like you’re sliding backwards six inches for every step forward you take.

Once you hit the top of the ridge, the trail flattens out with some slight undulations. The trail skirts part of a neighborhood here, but you’ll quickly move past it and again feel like you’re in nature. From the top of this ridge line, you’ll get great views overlooking Anaheim Hills and Yorba Linda to the left, and a giant expanse of wilderness that connects to the wilderness parks of south county to the right.

[flickr id=”6173931935″ thumbnail=”small” overlay=”false” size=”medium” group=”” align=”right”] As you move further along the ridge line, you’ll come to another “Y” in the road. Going left, you’ll see a very steep single-track trail going to the top of a little peak. To the right, the main trail continues around the peak and on to the rest of the route. On a clear day, the peak offers superb 360 degree views of the area but you’ll have to backtrack down the single-track to get back to the main trail.

As you come around the peak, you’ll find a third “Y” in the trail. If you head downhill to the right, you’ll be on a trail called Deer Weed Trail, which connects backs down to the lower part of the Anaheim Hills Riding and Walking Trail. If you want a slightly shorter route you can take Deer Weed Trail, but you’ll miss some of the nicer parts of the Anaheim Hills Riding and Walking Trail. Continue reading Weir Canyon Wilderness Park – Anaheim Hills Riding and Walking Trail